• Computer,  Technology

    View Inside the Cloud

    Coughlin thinks of cloud computing as “an outsourcing for your technology assets”. He further says that “cloud computing is a service in which an internet connected machine and remote digital storage are both used to provide a number of capabilities for both business and personal uses. Technically speaking, he said that there were three types of cloud computing services that are commonly put to use: infrastructure as a service, platform as a service and finally, software as a service. With the first mentioned cloud computing service, Parsik says, clients have access to virtual servers in the third party service provider’s data centre, which can be used any way we want.

    In this case users have to install their own software and also be responsible for maintaining it. This option gives the users enough flexibility and scalability says Parsik. Another feature is that if a user needs 3-4 servers to run his systems, and needs 50 during the holiday season, he will not have to buy more servers but can just rent the additional servers on the cloud system. An example of an Iaas is Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud, which is also called as EC2.

    Paas includes all the features of the Iaas, with clients using the provider’s computing platform including an operating system, developer tools, database and web servers through which users can develop and run their software in the cloud without having to bear the cost and the complexity of buying and then managing the underlying hardware. Paas allows the user better economies of scale with the trade off being that platform provider’s ability to lock down the service so that you can not use your own tools. The Google App Engine, with which users develop and host web applications using Google development tools, is a good example of a Paas.

  • Technology

    Pros and Cons of DBaaS-Database As a Service

    Managing data is a key to success.

    Before listing the pros and cons of DBaaS, we need to explore a few decisions businesses have to make.

    These include numerous quick decisions about data handling that can set them on a path that, if incorrect, are difficult and costly to correct. Those decisions are:

    • What database type to use, SQL or NoSQL?
    • What are the data storage and query needs? Transactional? Big Data?
    • What database system to use? A few SQL choices might be Oracle, MySQL, MSSQL, and Sybase. A few No-SQL choices might be MongoDB or Cassandra.
    • Do we have DBA (database administrator) talent or do we have to hire?
    • What kind of server or resources are needed? What are my power, server, disk, processing, network, and IO requirements?
    • How do I maintain, backup, administer and otherwise own the database framework?
    • What is my cost of ownership?

    First let’s explore which database type to use, SQL or NoSQL.

    Traditional database types classified as SQL have a significant place in businesses and are a mainstay for business choices. However, as companies start to create applications that drive decisions based on significant database analysis of large, almost unfathomable amounts of data, they migrate to NoSQL solutions like MongoDB or Cassandra.

    The architecture of NoSQL makes it a good choice for big data solutions while the built in protections of a transactional based system like Oracle make it a better choice for banking or similar solutions.

    When it comes to picking a specific system, businesses tend to stick with what they know. In other words, if they already have Oracle, and Oracle talent, then when management asks those individuals which database system they should use on Project X, it should be no surprise that they pick Oracle.

    Matching a specific database system to a set of business requirements is an arduous task that should always be looked at with a fresh perspective. It should not just be based on what talent is already employed or what systems a business is comfortable with.

    Let’s face it, if a business picks correctly, all is good. If they pick incorrectly, they have wasted a lot of resources which equates to dollars. Enter DBaaS.

    Where DBaaS excels is that it gives businesses the ability to test the waters a bit, to try before they invest heavily.

    DBaaS acts as a stepping stone to total ownership, a cost effective solution to help you figure out your needs prior to investing heavily.

    DBaaS has both pros and cons.

    First, it is necessary to distinguish between “hosting database systems” and DBaaS.

    There are many cloud based solutions that “host” a database system but provide no significant help in configuration, tuning, consulting, and providing the talent needed to actually use those systems.

    True DBaaS provides both the system and the talent to help you utilize the database and determine how to store, query, and analyze your data. The value of DBaaS goes way beyond the hosting.

    The pros of DBaaS include:

    • No equipment or software licenses.
    • Flexibility. Multiple choices are available to test drive your applications and pick the right platform for your business requirements.
    • Significantly less staffing requirements. The DBaaS provider handles installation, configuration, and in many cases development.
    • Offsite hosting, providing protection from local power failures or disasters. Many businesses design their system with power redundancy in mind, but, in reality, rarely meet those goals.
    • SLA agreements that have redundancy, uptime, and backup protections. A DBaaS provider has intent focus on protecting your data.

    Meantime the cons of DBaaS include:

    • Limited access to underlying servers. This can present itself as a feeling of no control.
    • Very little knowledge of how your data is protected from cyber security threats. This can be dangerous for sensitive data.

    So how do you decide? Is there a transition from one to the other? Yes, almost always, but by following a few guidelines to start with, DBaaS can be used properly.

  • Computer,  Technology

    Database Design

    In order to manage that data, businesses become reliant on computer systems. Some are more complicated than others, but all have the same basic purpose: to help record, track and store that crucial data. But once data begins to be collected you have the question of what to do with it next? How do you figure out ways to manipulate that data in order to learn from it? That’s the basis of a good database design.

    While most business owners may understand the need for analyzing and using their data, they generally don’t have the specific skills necessary to design a useful database. That’s when they usually turn to IT professionals to tap into their unique skill set and get the help they need. And this is why having a database design business of your own could put you in the driver’s seat.

    Unlike those untrained business owners, you have the ability to look at sets of data and figure out the best system for manipulating them in order to get useful results. You do this by considering the data itself, then looking at how various data elements relate to each other and finally using those relationships to form an overall structure within which the various data sets will work together.

    It may seem matter of fact to you as an IT professional, but to most standard computer users it’s almost like trying to read Chinese. It can seem overwhelming and that can give you an opportunity to step in and offer your services as a translator of sorts, enabling business owners to better understand their own data so that they can make the most of it and ultimately make the most of their business.

    Since the interpretation of data can ultimately lead to greater profits, it’s something that all business owners should be eager to take advantage of and that should allow you to position yourself for success as well. With the proper marketing and the use of internet-online contacts, your database design business can become the go-to-solution for all sorts of business owners and before you know it you’ll be earning that income you always dreamed of.

    When you’re thinking about setting up your own business, don’t overlook the advantage that your knowledge of database design gives you. Offering your services in what is truly the heart of IT may give you just the opportunity you’ve been looking for to establish yourself in the field. So put those data management skills to good use today!